Fast Women: Jacqueline Evans—Queen of the Carrera Panamericana

She may have never finished higher than 37th place (in a Chrysler Saratoga in 1952), but I have huge respect for anyone that attempted to tackle the mighty Carrera Panamericana. Jacqueline Evans, however, was not content to just do the race once. Ms. Evans was a piloto at every year of the Carreras running—from 1950 to 1954.

Arguably it was the 1953 race with her behind the wheel of the Eva Peron tribute Porsche 356 for which she’s most remembered. The car is certainly among the most famous liveries of the period. With its vibrantly painted portrait of the recently deceased First Lady of Argentina. Although she ran overtime which resulted in her disqualification in the race she is among the most photographed racers that year. Whether it was because of the exotic livery, the relative novelty of a woman racer, or because she just looked so very cool is anyone’s guess… but I’m sure glad she was.

En representacion de las mujeres del mundo indeed.

Reader’s Racer: Christian’s Carrera Panamericana Lincoln

La Bestia. Chris Reichardt's Carrera Lincoln

Christian sent in this photo of his Lincoln, “La Bestia” tackling the mighty Carrera Panamericana. Even in its modern interpretation, the Carrera is no joke and participants tend to be of one of two camps: Those that just had to do it once—and after a week of grueling conditions wonder what made them do this treacherous thing—and those that return year after year ready for more. Christian is the latter, and that deserves some props, don’t you think?

I love sharing photos of readers’ cars, guys. Keep ’em coming:

Ebay Find: 1954 Carrera Panamericana Armbands

Carrera Panamericana Armbands

It’s a shame that the original patron and pilot who owned these armbands aren’t identified. Whoever they were, I’m a little surprised that the driver’s identification is in better shape than the sponsor’s. I would imagine that 1,910 miles of Mexican road dust would shred that piece of fabric during the race, but here it is looking damned good 60 years later. (The auction lists it as a “sponsor” armband, but I’ve also seen “patrocinador” used to mean “team owner”.)

Buy it now at $1,995. Sounds expensive to me too, but when are you going to see another one of these—let alone two of them?