Factories at Work: Lotus in the Elan Years

This Is It. The New One. The Hot One.

Triumph GT6 Ad

Humming tires. Snarling engine. Whistling wind. Triumph GT-6.

This is it. The new one. The hot one. That fastback sports car that offers more than just a sloping rear. This is the 6-cylinder Triumph GT-6.

From its sleek-bodied Grand Prix racing prototype, we retained the proven performance of four forward synchromesh gears. Rack-and-pinion steering. 4-wheel independent suspension. Disc brakes. Radial ply tires. (Performance/safety features that helped the GT-6 prototypes finish 1-2 in their class at Le Mans.)

Next we added certain luxury refinements. To name just a few: fully-instrumented walnut dash. Pile carpeting. Roomy bucket seats. Padded leather-covered steering wheel. Easy entry to luggage compartment through large rear door. Wire wheels. Back-up lights.

So, you see, the new Triumph GT-6 is not just a fastback. It’s the fastback.

Triumph GT-6

Standard equipment: heater/defroster, windshield washers, wire wheels. Suggested retail price $2995 East Coast POE plus optional extras, state and/or local taxes. See Yellow Pages for nearest dealer. Available in Canada and also for overseas delivery. Standard-Triumph Motor Company, Inc., 111 Galway Place, Teaneck, New Jersey 07666

Race-Bred From a Line of International Successes

Highlights of the 1969 British Grand Prix

Jim Clark’s “Swinging Style”

Stirling Moss and Merging Passions

1950 Silverstone Map

Silverstone Track Map 1950

You can clearly see Silverstone’s history in this 1950 map of the circuit. That triangle of runways so typical of RAF Class-A airbases during the second World War is clearly evident. Even if you’re familiar with the many changes at Silverstone over the years, the start/finish position is defining characteristic for this period between ’49 and ’51 before it was relocated to between Woodcote and Copse.

There is more than the track itself to point to the era on this map. The “buffets” identified on the map conjures images of something more than a beer and pretzel tent. I’m also mildly surprised to see a “missing persons” tent, which I wouldn’t have thought would have come into play until much later, corresponding with the shorter leash that people tend to keep on kids with each generation.

And that lettering(!): hand-rendered but striving for draftsman’s perfection. The detailing surrounding the Silverstone titling is reason enough to covet this thing and is reminiscent of vintage stock certificate lettering or book title pages or bank notes. Wonderful.

You OK Up There?

Cooper on the Roof - 1949

Cooper on the Roof - 1949Major Peter Braid had quite a ride during this Formula 3 race at Blandford Army camp in August 1949.

Presumably Braid had some flight experience because I can think of no other way he might have gotten his F3 Cooper up on the guardroom house, but apparently a bus stop and a tree gave him a boost along the way.

Production Value

Cooper exhibition stand

It’s auto show season. While the latest supercars and minivans are being debuted in Detroit and LA, let’s remember that some of the best racing cars ever made didn’t have so much as a sheet to pull back when they debuted. Today’s vehicle launches are multimedia extravaganzas of celebrity-hosted augmented reality audio visual choreography that seemingly had more effort in their planning than the econobox they’re revealing.

Not so with the Cooper 500 shown here. Just pull up a cafe chair to set the engine on, hand paint a placard with the maker’s name, and park ’em over by the rollup warehouse door. Done and done.

This is it—the Mk. VI Elva

elvaAd

The Best Small Sports Racing Car produced today—irrespective of price.

This is it—the Mk. VI Elva.

If you don’t agree, I would be interested to know your reasons by phone (Hastings 51371) or letter—Frank Nichols

Elva Cars (1961) Ltd., Hastings, Sussex

I love the bluster of this ad copy, as if Frank is challenging me to a fight if I don’t love the Mk. VI. Easy, Frank. I do.