’56 Morgan+4 On Display

Morgan Ad 1956You have seen this production model Morgan victorious in competition. A consistent So. Calif. Winner (Bok Oker, Driver)!

The same outstanding performance is available in any new Morgan.

See and test drive the car considered one of the finest hand made class E roadsters.

’56 Morgan + 4 on display

  • Hand Made by skilled craftsmen
  • Sliding pillar front suspension (Pat. by Morgan over 40 yrs.)
  • Proven 90 H.P. TR2 engine

Ed Savin Worldwide
312 So. Soto
ANgelus 8-7151
475 So. Atlantic
ANgelus 8-3264
Los Angeles

I’m Inc.
1968 S. Sepulveda
West Los Angeles
GRanite 8-1142

Published in MotoRacing. August 1956.

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Available at Auction: Ferrari 250 GTO no. 3851GT

Ferrari 250 GTO no. 3851GT

Ferrari 250 GTO no. 3851GT

The Monday after Monterrey weekend, you’ll be bombarded by these photos and the accompanying headlines from the media regarding how much this Ferrari 250 GTO will sell for at Bonham’s Quail Auction. For just a minute, lets ignore the investment grade of this hotly desired piece of kinetic sculpture. Lets ignore the sound business rationale that might drive this purchase—and will certainly drive the journalists that write about it post-sale. Let’s simply pause for a moment before that frenzy begins and just appreciate this gorgeous GTO for what it is: an incredible example of a beautiful racing car.

Let’s just cross our fingers and hope her new caretaker gets her out of the vault and onto the track occasionally.

More information at Bonham’s lot detail page.

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Porsche SA buys Kyalami

Here’s a round of auctioneering you don’t often see. Watch the bidding floor as Porsche SA purchases Kyalami for R205Million.

Thanks, Porsche for keeping Kyalami out of our Lost Tracks series.

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Robert Ristuccia’s 2014 Pittsburgh Vintage GP

Pittsburgh Vintage Grand Prix photo by Robert Ristuccia

Is there some way we can pool our money together to hire the committee that created the Pittsburgh Vintage Grand Prix and ship them to cities around the country reviving true road course vintage race weekends? I just don’t know how they did it. Can you imagine the administrative dance required to gain approvals for this kind of thing? If we could only discover their secret for accomplishing this minor miracle in today’s litigious society, just think of what we could do.

I believe these visionaries could make flights of fancy like the Central Park Vintage Grand Prix, a revived Golden Gate Park Road Races, or a return to Bridgehampton’s or Elkhart Lake’s or Pebble Beach’s street circuits a reality. Hell, they even managed to get the state of Pennsylvania to issue a PVGP license plate!

Small bore grid at Pittsburgh Vintage Grand Prix. Photo by Robert Ristuccia

Thankfully, Robert Ristuccia’s beautiful photos from the 2014 running of the PVGP let us tag along on something more immediately real. Just seeing these lovely racing machines from a wide variety of classes running on the closed streets of Schenley Park passing by stop signs and approaching the curbs is a wonderful reminder that real road racing can still exist.

Check out Robert Ristuccia’s entire set from the weekend for more. Thanks Robert!

via Reddit.

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Malte Dorowski’s Lego Martini Racing Porsches

Malte Dorowski's Lego Martini Porsche 911 Carrera RSR

I’m consistently amazed at what Lego builders can do with nothing more than their ingenuity and a handful of Lego bricks. Somehow those little blocky chunks of plastic can be massaged into the most beautiful contours. Malte Dorowski has put together a fairly complete Lego garage of Martini Racing Porsches (and transporter… and support vehicle), but it is probably no surprise that his take on the Carrera RSR is my favorite.

Malte Dorowski's Lego Martini Porsche 911 Carrera RSR EngineLook at those iconic bulbous arches around this thing. Coming up with this collection of bricks and assorted bits and bobs and deciding that they can come together to create that arch is mind boggling. Malte didn’t just get the general shape nailed down and call it a day though—the details are where this model really sings. The peek through the door at the gauge cluster; the way the windscreen wiper is perched; the steering wheel’s center button: They all come together and get that RSR just right. Absolutely beautiful work.

Malte Dorowski's Lego Martini Porsche team

More at Malte Dorowski’s Flickr gallery. Thanks for the heads up on this one, Ryan!

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James Garner. 1928 — 2014.

James Garner on the set of Grand Prix. 1966.

More at .

With a relevant tweet from Ron Howard:

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Proto Go-Pro

Jackie Stewart for Nikon

I wonder how Jackie Stewart controlled the shutter on this early attempt at onboard driver-controlled photography at Monaco in 1966. Do you think that cable stretched down to the steering wheel? More importantly, where do you think his photos from the “35mm Helmet” are?

Monaco in 1966 would have lined up nicely with the production of John Frankenheimer’s Grand Prix. I’m speculating here, but perhaps this is how some of the stills for the posters, premier program, and other ephemera were captured.

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Goodwood Festival of Speed Full Day Replays

Goodwood has done us one better with their live streams of the Festival of Speed and archived replays of the entire day’s activities. Here is Day 3 of the 2014 Festival of Speed, Day 1 and Day 2 are also available on their YouTube channel.

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British Pathé Presents Italian Motor Racing (1950-1959)

Monza Banking. No further commentary needed.

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Reviewed: A Question of Speed

Fred Bonatto's A Question of Speed

There are a lot of photographic studies of classic motoring available at the bookstore. Most of these are a collection published by a stock motoring photography house, with a variety of photographers images from the past slapped together under a sometimes tenuous theme. Occasionally we’ll see a singular volume from an individual photographer’s catalog. I tend to be more drawn to these as the work takes on a new perspective than simply the subject of the photographs. The consistency of photographic technique and the photographer’s eye lends the volume a more personal and intimate point of view that holds the book together.

Fred Bonatto’s A Question of Speed is akin to this later type of work, but with a key difference. Rather than a collection of decades old photography, Fred spent the summer of 2013 traveling to the Donnington Historic Festival, the Spa Six Hours race, and Copenhagen Historic GP documenting the cars and—vitally—the community of contemporary vintage racing. I love it.

An image from Fred Bonatto's A Question of Speed

The past few summers I’ve not been able to attend the number of vintage races that I would like and Fred’s book makes me feel like I’ve just returned from a great race weekend. The reason is simple: he turns his lens at wonderful cars—some in the pits and some on track. Just as importantly he also trains his eye on the real reason race weekends are so wonderful: the people that make them happen. The moments captured of drivers, mechanics, spectators, and corner workers all hard at work/play give you a real sense of being in the paddock on race weekend. We all know that the on-track action is only a fraction of the enjoyment of a solid race weekend.

An image from Fred Bonatto's A Question of SpeedI also appreciate Fred’s commitment to capturing the atmosphere of a race on black and white film. Film! I’m not necessarily a personal stalwart for chemical photo developing, but I do appreciate the confidence and patience that it takes to limit yourself. When I’m in the paddock, I shoot hundreds and hundreds of images with my digital camera knowing that I’ll be able to find a precious handful of quality shots from the weekend. That is a luxury that the expense of film makes impractical for me, but in the hands of a much more talented photographer, there’s a beauty in the grain of film photography that A Question of Speed captures beautifully.

Fred Bonatto’s A Question of Speed is like a perfect race weekend that I can pluck from the shelf anytime I like—whether it’s because I’m missing whatever vintage event happens to be this weekend, or because it’s mid-February. I’ll always have this wonderful little escape to the paddock right there on the shelf waiting for me.

A Question of Speed is limited to 100 precious copies and is available from fredbonatto.com.

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